The click's revenge

A little over a year ago, I took a look at the logfiles for this site and posted a story aggregating my findings.  It's time to do it again and get an idea of how things have changed in a year.  To make the comparison easier, I will look at the logs for August 2009 here.

The first data to examine is the country of origin for all of the web requests to this site.  Not surprisingly, the vast majority of you are located in the United States, with Great Britain coming in second.  The third place contender for the most number of clicks to the site is one, unfortunately, that I attribute mostly to spammers.  I say this because the overwhelming majority of login creation requests that I've seen this year use an email address at mail.ru, and in every case, they have all bounced or been ignored when I sent the account creation confirmation question.  The list in the legend for this pie chart is in the order that the countries ranked by number of page requests.

Page requests by country

The next statistics that I looked at last year related to the web browser that was being used to request all of these pages.  Personally, I use Firefox as it has been shown to be more secure and faster than Internet Explorer; Firefox is also available on all of the operating systems that I use, and I use all of the major operating systems (various flavors of Windows, Mac and Linux).  But since Firefox was not the most-used browser in August, it must mean that there are quite a lot more readers out there than just me and my friends.

Browsers used to access The Rip Track

The third metric that I looked at last year was which operating system was used to access the site.  Based on the browsers data, this isn't very surprising.  The majority of you out there are using some version of MS Windows when you visit this website.  What is most interesting here is that there are two new entries that weren't included last year; this year there are a couple of you who accessed the site from a gaming console.

My conclusions this year are still pretty similar to what I reached last year.  Most of the readers are from the United States (based on their IP addresses), so content about US railroads is still going to find the widest audience here.  But, judging by the wide range of countries represented, the occasional foray into foreign lands for content would not be completely discarded by everyone.  There are still a significant number of readers to this site that use free and open source software.  I would have liked to see larger ratios, but the FLOSS camp is still active and reassuringly large enough for me.