Podcast: Episode 1

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Here it is, the first episode of The Rip Track Podcast. In this show I discuss NTSB recommendations R-09-1 through -5 that have to do with uniform railroad signaling, I list a number of significant events in railroad history that occurred in May throughout the years, offer an excerpt from the Conversations About Photography conference sponsored by the Center for Rail Photography and Art, and I close with a Modeler's Moment describing one way to save some money on your model railroad purchases.

Don Sims Don Sims begins his lecture.


Mark HemphillMark Hemphill points out a location discussed in his lecture.
Both photos by Hank Koshollek.

Links to information mentioned in the show:

Listen to Episode 1

Comments

Accident Report

I opened the safety reccomendations, saw they referred to an accident report for an collision at Englewood Illinois. When I was an extra board towerman in 1960-1962 for the Rock Island I frequently worked at Englewood tower. Back then the current NS line was a four track PRR line (The former Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago) with the 2 tracks by the depot for passenger service and the 2 tracks by the tower for frate (I grew up reading Col. McCormick's Chicago Tribune). When I started the PRR had one set of crossevers but as part of Dan Ryan construction while I was there got a set going the opposite direction. The old stuff was pipe line connected to the armstrong levers while the new stuff was electric off the armstrong levers. The Rock Island had 3 tracks crossing the PRR tracks, all for frate and passenger, the two nearest the depot for trains that would stop and track 5 (the third track - right there they were numbered 3, 4 and 5 - all things considered it DID make sense from downtown Chicago through Joliet) for express commuter passenger trains. Things have changed over the years